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Home Category: Surfing

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So did Bono at the Golden Globes two years later.

Basically the Court tossed out a bunch of fines the FCC was desperately trying to levy on the networks for some uncensored outbursts on live TV shows. What were those outbursts? Cher blurted out “fuck” during a speech at the 2002 Billboard Music Awards.

So did Bono at the Golden Globes two years later. And Paris Hilton and Nicole Richie after that. Nobody really noticed and nobody much cared, except for the FCC, whose panties were tightened up into a big-time bunch. But they were pretty much it. Not even the grouchy elders of the Supreme Court could rouse themselves to take offense.
Yet this past December at the Poll Awards, when Noa Deane and the Strange Rumblings crew lobbed an F-bomb toward pro surfing’s governing body, and hipster darling Dion Agius referenced the use of Xanax during his acceptance speech, the surf community’s reaction made the Supreme Court look like a bunch of anarchistic libertines. Grown men took to their social-media accounts (that really should be an oxymoron) to ponder whether or not it was appropriate for a bunch of obviously drunk, and possibly skull-numbingly high, surfers to use profanity and admit to drug use in public.

Surfers, at an awards show—a big, rollicking party, basically—were taken to task for partying too hard.

Agius and Deane, tails between their legs, felt enough pressure to use their social platforms to mount heartfelt apologies to anyone who was offended by their rowdy behavior.

What can be learned from this recent outburst of moralizing? First, Cher is obviously much, much gnarlier than pro surfers are; she apologized to no one. Second, and more importantly, the “surfers as rebels” trope—which has always been at least a little bit overblown—is probably officially dead and gone. Somehow, in the course of about 50 years, we’ve gone from fetishizing Dora to tut-tutting Noa.

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The True Island Experience

Line Icon Examples in Web Design

With highly popular flat and solid icons, line style glyphs rule the roost this year. They have found their place not only in traditional control centers, navigation bars, social media widgets or pagination but also in an inner structure such as service sections or feature lists.

From tiny intuitive vigilantly crafted variants to enormous and bold responsive versions, from one-tone realization to lavish solution, they are optimal and viable instruments for enriching design aesthetics, highlighting key points, supporting important text blocks, reinforcing navigation through the project and simply enhancing the user experience. Its delicate nature and a ton of personality can add subtle sprucing up to any integral part of the website.

Today, we have collected different examples where this type of refined line icons fits snugly to the composition, is in conformity with the general formatting style and benefits the project in its graceful way.

From tiny intuitive vigilantly crafted variants to enormous and bold responsive versions, from one-tone realization to lavish solution, they are optimal and viable instruments for enriching design aesthetics, highlighting key points, supporting important text blocks, reinforcing navigation through the project and simply enhancing the user experience. Its delicate nature and a ton of personality can add subtle sprucing up to any integral part of the website.

Web Design

Anchour leverages only four huge double-line icons that are used as visual cues for supporting the section of agency’s sphere of expertise. They go well with the entire theme and are well-suited to the elegant and sleek environment.

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Some would argue it was far from ideal, Jamie O’Brien

We’ve seen Teahupo’o bigger. We’ve seen it more perfect. But never has the world seen Tahiti’s most feared wave so big and so perfect at the same time.

Some would argue it was far from ideal, Jamie O’Brien called many of the waves 20-foot closeouts. This coming from the man who surfed the place on fire, first thing that morning. But in terms of picturesque, cavernous walls turning themselves into exaggerated caricatures of what we think a wave is meant to look like, this was as good as it gets.

Move over 2011’s Code Red, this is Code Orange, the slightly slimmer, slightly more attractive version of the average surfer’s nightmares.

If a wave of consequence breaks in the world, you can guarantee Tim Bonython will be there to capture the vision, and Filmers@Large’s most prolific contributor has gone above and beyond to deliver the goods once more.

Grab a lifejacket, some protective equipment and strap yourself in, this is the heaviest three minutes of footage you’ll watch this year.

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